When Rome Burned

Through historical records and archaeology, author Anthony Barrett relates a detailed accounting of the Great Fire of Rome and how it profoundly changed the empire’s history.

The First Wave

Discoveries at multiple sites are shedding new light on the earliest dispersal of modern humans out of Africa.

The Remarkable Skulls of Drimolen

Paleoanthropologist Stephanie Baker relates the amazing discovery of the world's oldest known Homo erectus, an early human ancestor.

Farmers and Warriors

Researchers suggest how the development of agriculture shaped cooperation, competition and conflict among ancient Native American populations.

The Herculaneum Papyri

What do the Herculaneum scrolls have to do with the decipherment of the iconic Rosetta Stone, key to unlocking Egyptian hieroglyphs? These authors explain.

The Mystery of the Tumuli

Over 400 mounds on New Caledonia in the southwest Pacific may mark a human presence predating the current earliest generally accepted dates by thousands of years.

The Shaman’s World

Extending far into human prehistory, the shaman has played a major role in the psyche for survival and our perception of the world around us.

Return to Shanidar

Scientists are opening a new chapter on Neanderthals at the famous Shanidar Cave near the northern edge of Iraq.

Moundbuilders, B.C.

Centuries before the construction of the pyramids of Egypt and the Stonehenge circle in England, ancient people began creating massive monumental earthworks in North America.

African Treasure

Priceless artifacts from Africa tell a story of culture and colonialism.

Uncovering the Early Mycenaeans

Excavations of princely tombs are shedding new light on a formative time before the high florescence of the Mycenaean civilization.

Rewriting Prehistory at Stélida

Archaeologists are digging up new clues about ancient toolmakers who quarried on an island hill in the Aegean Sea 200,000 years ago.
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